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How NOT to make a homemade training video

According to our 2018 Learning Index survey 64% of L&D professionals make their own videos for learning.

Now let’s face facts, majority of them will be rubbish. So we at Video Arts have compiled the top five things to avoid when you’re deciding what to put in your DIY video for learning.

DON’T SET “MAKING A VIDEO” AS YOUR OBJECTIVE
Making a video is not an end goal in itself. Start by thinking about what you need to achieve. Specifically, what do you want people to think, feel and do differently as a result of watching your film?

DON’T BLAG IT
Know your subject; or make sure someone else does. Think about the learning points you’re trying to get across and find a subject matter expert to validate them. But, remember a subject matter expert’s job is to know the subject; they’re not always the best person to write engaging dialogue.

DON’T MISREAD YOUR AUDIENCE
Many L&D managers have died metaphorical deaths from not thinking properly about how their audience would react to their video. Are there any defining characteristics (age, job function, etc) of your audience that should influence how you deliver your message.

DON’T WING IT
Anyone can learn how to build a basic storyboard and it will help you structure your story and signpost your learning points by defining a sequence of shots. Not everyone can learn to write scripts or act well and both of these are essential if you’re planning on any kind of dramatic approach to your video. A good script, well acted will engage your audience. Clunky dialogue plus bad acting is how car crash video happens.

DON’T LET THEM FALL ASLEEP
Leonardo DiCaprio might be able to keep our attention for 120 minutes on screen, but can you? Even if you’re producing lots of content, break it down into short snappy clips (3 minutes as a rough guide) to keep the attention of your learners.

Happy filming!

Written by
Video Arts

Video Arts

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Mark Helen Baxendale
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